San Antonio Police Department

When making an arrest, officers with the San Antonio Police Department must follow the procedures issued in the general manual for Warrantless Arrests, Searches, and Seizures.

Although officers have discretion when exercising their authority to make a warrantless arrest, the officer must follow the General Manual Procedures – Section 500 on Arrest Procedures. These procedures were designed to help officers of the San Antonio Police Department when determining whether to conduct warrantless arrests, searches, and seizures.

Attorney for an Arrest in San Antonio, TX

If an officer with the San Antonio Police Department arrested you, then contact an experienced criminal defense attorney at Goldstein, Goldstein, Hilley & Orr. Our attorneys are familiar with the standard operating procedures used by officers in San Antonio when making an arrest either with or without a warrant.

Contact us for a free consultation to discuss your case, the potential penalties and ways to fight for an outright dismissal. Call us at (210) 226-1463 today.


Thirty (30) Most Common Reasons for an Arrest in San Antonio, TX

The San Antonio Police Department released information showing the thirty (30) most common criminal offenses for which individuals were arrested in 2014 including;

  1. Warrants – Number of arrests: 14,478
  2. Ordinance violation – general city violations – Number of arrests: 6,181
  3. Public Intoxication – Number of arrests: 6,060
  4. Driving while under the influence – Number of arrests: 6,026
  5. Theft – $50-$500 – Number of arrests: 3,115
  6. Theft – under $50 – Number of arrests: 2,708
  7. Possession of marijuana 0-2 ounces – Number of arrests: 2,130
  8. Minor in possession of an alcoholic beverage – Number of arrests: 2,057
  9. Possession of a controlled substance – less than 1 gram – Number of arrests: 1,946
  10. Possession of an open container or consumption of alcohol – Number of arrests: 1,291
  11. Assault bodily injury – married or cohabiting couples – Number of arrests: 949
  12. Violation of a city ordinance – restaurants and TABC offenses – Number of arrests: 929
  13. Theft under $1,500 enhanced – Number of arrests: 833
  14. Aggressive solicitation in public areas – Number of arrests: 773
  15. Possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver 4 grams-200 grams – Number of arrests: 742
  16. Possession of a controlled substance 1 gram-4 grams – Number of arrests: 699
  17. Pedestrian solicitation – Number of arrests: 681
  18. Park curfew – Number of arrests: 645
  19. Criminal trespass private property – Number of arrests: 628
  20. Camping in public – Number of arrests: 576
  21. Traffic – Number of arrests: 498
  22. Soliciting from occupants of vehicles – Number of arrests: 496
  23. Moving traffic violations – Number of arrests: 489
  24. Assault bodily injury – family household – Number of arrests: 486
  25. Possession of drug paraphernalia – Number of arrests: 441
  26. Prostitution – Number of arrests: 413
  27. Sell, possess, consume or distribute alcohol – Number of arrests: 412
  28. Assault bodily injury – Number of arrests: 404
  29. Theft of vehicle $1,500-$20,000 – Number of arrests: 380
  30. Resisting arrest, search or transportation – Number of arrests: 360

2017 Bexar County Warrant Roundup

Each year, the San Antonio Police Department participates in the Warrant Resolution Campaign. The last campaign, the 2017 Bexar County Warrant Roundup was conducted in early February in 2017. The campaign starts with a grace period for people who have yet to pay fines for outstanding warrants. After the grace period, San Antonio police and other Texas law enforcement agencies begin making arrests on outstanding warrants issued in Bexar County, TX..


The Basis for a Warrantless Arrest in San Antonio, TX

For officers in Texas, the authority to make an arrest without a warrant is entirely statutory. An officer’s good faith does not justify an invalid arrest. If an officer acts outside of his authority in making a warrantless arrest, the officer is subject to both civil and criminal liability.

An officer should make a warrantless arrest only if he has enough personal knowledge or reliable information to constitute probable cause upon which an arrest warrant could have been issued if time had permitted. Officers are generally permitted to make a warrantless arrest for the following types of offense: 

  • any Alcohol Beverage Code violation under Chapter 101, Article 101.02;
  • dispersing riot under Chapter 8, Article 8.04; 
  • offense within view under Article 14.01; 
  • offense within view of the magistrate under Article 14.02;
  • suspicious places and circumstances under Article 14.03(a)(1);
  • assault – bodily injury under Article 14.03(a)(2);
  • family violence – bodily injury under Article 14.03(a)(4);
  • interference with an emergency call under Article 14.03(a)(5);
  • confession of a felony under Article 14.03(a)(6);
  • violation of protective order under Article 14.03(b) and Article 14.03(a)(3);
  • fleeing felon under Article 14.04;
  • preventing consequences of theft under Chapter 18, Article 18.16;
  • the Uniform Criminal Extradition Act under Chapter 51, Article 51.13
  • Health and Safety Code violation under Chapter 462, Section 462.041 for a Chemically Dependent Person;
  • violations of the Parks and Wildlife Code under Chapter 11, Article 11.0191;
  • violation of the Transportation Code under Chapter 543, Section 543.001

This article was last updated on Friday, November 11, 2017.

(210) 226-1463
  1. Attorneys
  2. Results
  3. Contact
Left Menu Icon

Goldstein, Goldstein, Hilley & Orr