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Motorcycle Club Members

Between the 1967 publication of Hunter S. Thompson’s Hell's Angels: The Strange and Terrible Saga of the Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs and the seven seasons that the television drama “Sons of Anarchy” spanned before ending in 2014, Americans have been fascinated by the culture, styles, and other various aspects of motorcycle clubs. However, since the first outlaw motorcycle clubs were founded and popularized, these groups have been commonly decried as criminals by various law enforcement agencies.

Texas in particular has seen this interpretation furthered as a result of the violent shootout at Texas Confederation of Clubs and Independents meeting in a Waco Twin Peaks restaurant on May 17, 2015. Despite authorities being unable to say how many of the nine bikers killed sustained fatal injuries because of police gunfire, more than 170 people were arrested and charged with engaging in organized crime. It is not uncommon for members of motorcycle clubs to face criminal charges even though they have never broken the law.

San Antonio Motorcycle Club Members Lawyer

If you are a member of a motorcycle club who is being investigated or has already been arrested by law enforcement for alleged criminal activity, it is in your best interest to have skilled legal representation. Goldstein, Goldstein, Hilley & Orr defends clients throughout Bexar County and surrounding areas against all types of misdemeanor and felony offenses.

Our Texas motorcycle club member attorneys are committed to aggressively pursuing the most favorable outcomes to criminal cases. We will provide a complete evaluation of your case as soon as you call 210-226-1463 to schedule a free, confidential consultation.


Texas Motorcycle Club Members Overview


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Law Enforcement Use of Gang Label for Motorcycle Club Members in Bexar County

Motorcycle clubs organize a number of charity events in communities all over the nation. These include toys and coats for underprivileged children, poker tournaments, fundraising rides for military veterans, and several other events for additional causes.

Unfortunately, law enforcement agencies frequently claim that motorcycle clubs only use these charitable acts to cover up their criminal activities. Many agencies continue to refer to all motorcycle clubs as “gangs” and are quick to label them as criminal enterprises.

For instance, the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) has classified the Bandidos Motorcycle Club (referred to by DPS as the “Bandidos Outlaw Motorcycle Gang”) as a Tier 2 Gang Threat, the agency's second-highest rating. DPS has stated that the Bandidos “seek to turn public sentiment in their favor by organizing frequent charity runs.”

Additionally, the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) also includes the Bandidos Motorcycle Club among its listing of Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs (OMGs), which are organizations that the DOJ alleges “whose members use their motorcycle clubs as conduits for criminal enterprises.” Other motorcycle clubs that the DOJ claims “pose a serious national domestic threat” include:

  • Black Pistons Motorcycle Club
  • Hells Angels Motorcycle Club
  • Mongols Motorcycle Club
  • Outlaws Motorcycle Club
  • Pagans Motorcycle Club
  • Sons of Silence
  • Vagos Motorcycle Club

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Common Criminal Charges Against Texas Motorcycle Club Members

Because motorcycle clubs often travel in large groups and wear emblems, patches, or other insignia that makes their affiliation well-known, members can often be arrested and charged with criminal offenses even when there is little evidence that any crime has been committed. In many cases, alleged offenders are only guilty by association, having simply known someone who was the victim or is a suspect in a criminal case.

A few of the most common kinds of criminal charges that members of motorcycle clubs can face include, but are not limited to:

  • Aggravated assault
  • Aggravated kidnapping
  • Aggravated robbery
  • Burglary
  • Capital murder
  • Criminal conspiracy
  • Drug Trafficking
  • Engaging in organized criminal activity
  • Kidnapping
  • Manufacture or delivery of controlled substance
  • Murder
  • Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) or racketeering offenses
  • Robbery
  • Theft

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Defending Motorcycle Club Members in Bexar County

Sometimes, eagerness by police to accuse a member of a motorcycle club of committing a criminal offense does not always result in criminal charges. In many felony cases, grand juries will no-bill (or vote not to return an indictment) alleged offenders.

However, even when members of motorcycle clubs are charged with certain crimes, there can often be multiple defense options that can result in the charges being dismissed. Every case is unique, but some of the most common ways that alleged offenders in these situations are able to overcome the charges they face include, but are not limited to:

  • Lack of evidence
  • Illegal search and seizure
  • Constitutional rights violation
  • Misidentification
  • Coerced confession
  • Entrapment
  • Self-defense
  • Other police misconduct

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Find a Motorcycle Club Members Lawyer in San Antonio

Are you a member of a motorcycle club in Texas who is under investigation for or has been charged with committing an alleged crime? You should seek experienced legal counsel as soon as possible.

Goldstein, Goldstein, Hilley & Orr fight to protect the rights of clients in state and federal courts throughout the Lone Star State. Call 210-226-1463 right now to have our Bexar County motorcycle club member attorneys review your case during a free consultation.

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